“Ganja Rush”

“Ganja Rush”,

or the Regulation of a Natural in the Land of a Thousand Kisses,

by Papillon Philippe, Comte du Cray

The prohibition has ended. Welcome to the second G…. Rush.

For the first time in the history of American capitalism, the tobacco and alcohol industries are going to get some serious competition. Their markets will shrink a substantial amount; may be 25%.

How is this going to happen you might ask?

Very simply: the new kid on the block is called cannabis (C). Its consumption and its trade is now, as we speak, being legalized by the state governments of Washington and Colorado. You can now walk the streets of downtown Seattle while puffing on a (C) cigarette, freely. I was doing so last month one evening. A policeman walked by me. He did not say a word, nor did he even look in my direction. But he for sure smelled it. I suspected he probably smoked it too…

A new society awareness is being invented by the American population. One can draw a direct parallel with the 1930’s when alcohol became finally legal.

Only one must add to this comparison a fact of pure wonder, the one that will change the world as we know it: cannabis acting as the “health angel”, which in turn will prove alcohol (as well as tobacco) as “hell’s angels”. An iconic, societal combat is about to begin.

We will separate our study in two parts:

The first explains how cannabis teaches you the creative process, which starts with the thought process and finishes with the emotional one, while the link is played by the nervous system. Creativity is the voyage between the thought and the emotion. To travel the distance, we depend on the nerve. We ride on it.

We must therefore protect the latter — which is what alcohol (A), tobacco (T) and cannabis (C) do so well — in order to facilitate the creative process. Only we will explain how one of those three actors, (C), does it so much more effectively, because, among other reasons (those two being linked):

It creates much less side effects than the two others; which, in turn, makes (C) a much better actor on neuro-transmitters.

The second part will explain how the (C) makes you physiologically aware of the deficits of (A) and (T), and their taxing on one’s psycho-physical wealth. We all know about how bad those two compounds are for us (except for the moderate consumption of wholesome, pure, synthetics free red wine). But here, we will explore how (C) gets you to the feeling of such deficits, which in turn will subconsciously dictate behavioral and life style changes. And that for the better.

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Photo by Noom Srisunakorn
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Posted on January 23, 2013, in Music and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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